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Emergency Contraceptive Pills


If you have had sex within the past few days and:

  • You didn’t use birth control, or
  • The condom broke, or
  • You started your pill pack late, or
  • Your diaphragm slipped, or
  • You missed your birth control shot, or
  • You were forced to have sex…

There is something you can do!

Take Emergency Contraceptive Pills (ECPs) within a few days of unprotected or unplanned sex to reduce your chances of becoming pregnant.


What are ECPs?

They are ordinary birth control pills taken in special doses. Taken within a few days of having unprotected or unplanned sex, ECPs can reduce your chance of getting pregnant by 75 percent. ECPs can prevent or delay eggs from being produced.

  • ECPs will not cause an abortion.
  • ECPs will not work if you are pregnant.
  • ECPs will not reduce your risk of HIV/AIDS or Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs.)

ECPs are for emergency use only!

If you are having sex, it is important that you use a regular and effective method of birth control. Condoms should also be used to protect you from STDs including HIV/AIDS.

Abstinence is always the best way to avoid pregnancy. But, if you are having sex, it’s crucial that you protect yourself from both pregnancy and disease.

Some Side Effects of ECPs may last a day or two. They may include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sore breasts
  • Headaches
  • Next period may be early or late




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